Archive for January, 2015

Blizzard Juno – January 26 – 27, 2015

January 28, 2015

Snowstorm_012615_012815Recorded by a Weston Observatory seismograph.
The strongest waves begin at about 5:00 AM on January 27.

Click here: “Watching the Weather Using a Seismograph, by Dr. John Ebel, for an explanation detailing how a seismograph records microseisms, ground vibrations caused primarily by meteorological conditions.

Recorded on Jan. 28th by Nock Middle School, Newburyport, MA:
Nock school

Recorded on Jan. 28th by Merrimack Public Library, NH:
MLNH

Advertisements

PLAINFIELD, CT – Dr. Alan Kafka answers questions about earthquakes in CT – Jan 17, 2015

January 18, 2015

PLAINFIELD, CT (Jan 17, 2015) – The auditorium at Plainfield High School was packed on Friday night with residents who came to hear Dr. Alan Kafka, Director of Weston Observatory, answer their questions about the recent earthquake activity they experienced.

“Earthquake Safety, Education Meeting Held at Plainfield High” (News 8, WTNH)
http://wtnh.com/2015/01/16/earthquake-safety-education-meeting-held-at-plainfield-high/

“Quake Expert: Plainfield’s Rumblings Still A Mystery” (Hartford Courant)
http://www.courant.com/community/plainfield/hc-plainfield-earthquake-meeting-20150116-story.html

“Hundreds Attend Meeting to Quell Quake Concerns” (NBC News 10)
http://www.turnto10.com/story/27873761/hundreds-show-up-meeting-to-quell-quake-concerns

Earthquakes near Danielson, CT – January, 2015

January 14, 2015

CT earthquake_012015 CT earthquake map_012015

Recent earthquakes in Connecticut:

CT quakes

 

We recorded the recent magnitude 3.1 quake in Connecticut very well on both our research and educational seismographs.
Above is an interesting comparison of the differences in quality of recording for our research seismograph vs. our educational seismograph (both in Devlin Hall, Boston College).
If you were watching the Devlin seismograph on the day of the quake, and saw a sharp spike at the time of the quake, that was the quake (see graphic above).  It looks that way because we are displaying the entire day on the screen. The record is expanded to show what was recorded during the time of that short spike.